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July 2019 Archives

Canary in the Coal Mine: Professions Prone to Carbon Monoxide Exposure

In the early 1900s, miners carried canary birds into the mines with them as poison testers. At the time, no available instruments could detect carbon monoxide (CO) - a lethal, tasteless, odorless, invisible, flammable gas. However, if the canary stopped singing or perished from CO exposure, miners knew to evacuate. Canaries have since become ingrained in mining culture, even though more sophisticated technology has replaced them as CO detectors. Unfortunately, the same threat of CO in the workplace remains.

Chronic Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

You wouldn't willingly inhale a hefty whiff of tailpipe exhaust every morning after breakfast - you'd have to be crazy! But what if you were breathing something similarly toxic without knowing it? Carbon monoxide (CO) - a colorless, odorless, tasteless, deadly gas - is a byproduct from burning fuels. It is extremely harmful with cumulative, damaging effects.

Scaffolds most common cause of construction workplace accidents

Workers in the construction industry face a significant number of on-the-job risks, and understandably so. The nature of construction work is dangerous, and hazards such as falling objects, dangerous machinery and more can cause serious harm. This is far from the full extent of hazards, and these types of workplace accidents are dwarfed by a specific type of risk -- scaffold accidents.

Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

We know that one bite from a cobra can kill since its venom is toxic to humans. But did you know that a one-time exposure to the poisonous gas carbon monoxide can do the same thing? Scariest of all: we only see cobras at the zoo, but carbon monoxide is around us every day, and you can't even tell.

Diagnosing and treating carbon monoxide poisoning

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a dangerous and extremely toxic gas that you cannot see, smell, or taste. When someone gets CO poisoning, the CO binds to the hemoglobin in the blood and prevents oxygen from being distributed to the body. Hypoxia is the result, and it can cause organ failure, permanent brain damage, and even death.

How do you detect carbon monoxide in the air?

We measure length with a ruler, weight with a scale, and temperature with a thermometer, but how do you measure for the colorless, odorless, tasteless, and extremely toxic gas - carbon monoxide?

High-risk groups: who's most at risk for carbon monoxide poisoning?

Carbon monoxide (also known by its chemical formula "CO") is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, and non-irritating gas produced by burning fuels. When a person inhales it, CO binds to the hemoglobin in the blood and rapidly cuts off the body's oxygen supply. Acute poisoning can kill a person in minutes. Toxicologists consider CO one of the most dangerous poisons, dubbing it the "silent killer" for its elusive properties.

Will futuristic wearables prevent workplace accidents?

Every year, thousands of construction workers nationwide, including Texas, seek financial assistance through the workers' compensation systems of their states. They work in a hazardous industry, and workplace accidents are almost par for the course. Now, futuristic wearables for different purposes are being developed to prevent many work-related injuries while also focused on increasing profitability and efficiency.

Recovering from the loss of a limb

The loss of a limb is unquestionably tragic. While you may have heard inspiring stories of people who have lost arms or legs and have gone on to achieve great athletic feats, the reality is that those who lose limbs face day-to-day struggles with routine tasks.

Symptoms and Common Misdiagnoses of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

We don't pay much attention to the smoke rising off the grill, the exhaust trailing the family car, or the invisible backdraft flowing from the fireplace, but something lethal lurks in the fumes.

The insurance company is already building a case.

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