Fires break out for all kinds of reasons. Unattended candles, faulty electrical wiring or a person who falls asleep while smoking a cigarette could all lead to a conflagration that causes both property damage and injury to the occupants of the domicile. 

People who live through a building fire can experience a number of serious medical consequences as a result. Knowing three of the most common medical consequences of a significant fire can help you recognize the signs of these issues and seek the right care after a house fire.

People exposed to open fire can develop painful burns

Burns are among the most painful injuries a person can experience, as they can cause nerve damage that results and persistent discomfort even after the burn itself heels. Burns are tricky injuries, in part because they can continue to get worse even after someone gets away from the fire. As such, those with burns may require medical care even if their injuries don’t seem that severe at first.

Fires can cause respiratory damage due to smoke inhalation

The smoke that a fire produces is arguably more dangerous than the flames that can burn people. Quite a few people who die in house fires succumb to smoke inhalation and lack of oxygen, rather than burns. Not everyone who inhales dangerous levels of smoke will die. Some people will develop lung conditions or require respiratory assistance during their recovery.

Fires can cause emotional trauma that persists for years

The more property damage and injuries a fire causes, the more likely it is to have traumatized the people who lived through it. If someone loses a loved one, they’re at or even prized possessions they cannot replace, the fire may instill in a deep fear or lingering sense of anxiety. Some people may require counseling, while others may benefit from support groups. 

Unlike physical injuries, which are often obvious immediately after the fire, people with emotional injuries from a fire me not realize that they need help until sometime in the past.