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The highly debilitating issue that can follow broken bones

| Apr 9, 2021 | Auto Accidents |

Many injuries you might suffer in a car crash could have lifelong consequences. Compared to a traumatic brain injury or a spinal cord injury, a broken bone in your arm or leg may not seem like a major concern. Obviously you want medical care for it, but you likely anticipate making a total recovery.

For a small portion of those who suffer traumatic injuries, like fractures, in a car crash, their healing process will not unfold in the traditional way. Instead, they may find that they have worse symptoms even after their body heals the fracture itself. These individuals may have developed a secondary condition that could last for the rest of their lives.

How does a broken bone become a lifelong medical issue?

For most people, a broken bone heals cleanly and may only cause minor occasional discomfort during atmospheric pressure shifts. Most broken bones heal cleanly without lasting effect. For a tiny number of people, however, the traumatic injury of a broken bone will result in a nerve condition.

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) can occur after a broken bone or even after surgery. Warning signs of this condition include pain, weakness and discolored skin, hair or nails. People often note a difference in temperature between the affected body part and other parts of the body. They may experience deep, ongoing pain in the affected area. The symptoms may lead to a loss of strength or flexibility.

This is a lifelong condition that often worsens, meaning that symptoms will get worse over time. Those who discover that a broken bone has developed into CRPS after a car crash may need compensation even if they didn’t ask for it initially. The condition that they have could lead to thousands of dollars in medical care and might even eventually force them to leave their job. Legal action may be the only way to recoup those unexpected losses.